Project Opens New Shellfish Harvesting Area

Project Opens New Shellfish Harvesting Area
Posted on 06/01/2020
A previously prohibited area for harvesting shellfish in the Charlottetown harbour will open to commercial shellfish harvesters as their respective seasons begin, thanks to the decommissioning of the East Royalty Lagoon. The area downstream of the former lagoon will be available during the spring relay fishery.

Charlottetown Council voted in favour of the change to the Conditional Management Plan for the shellfish industry at their Council meeting in May. The management plan is an agreement between the City of Charlottetown, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada, and the PEI Department of Environment, Water and Climate Change.

The Conditional Management Plan is a multi-party agreement that governs shellfish harvesting in the harbor to ensure the safety and marketability of the shellfish products from the waters around Charlottetown.

“We’re very pleased that the diversion of wastewater from the East Royalty lagoon has resulted in another area available for PEI’s vital shellfish industry,” said Charlottetown Mayor Philip Brown. “This is one of the many benefits of the completion of this project, along with the reduction of our overall impact on the environment, and we hope to continue this work to clean up the waters around the Capital region.”

The Charlottetown Water and Sewer Utility operated the East Royalty Sewage Collection and Treatment System (lagoon) since the amalgamation of East Royalty in 1995. The system, which was located between Bonnie Blink Drive and Robertson Road, was constructed in 1987 and serviced more than 1,600 people. It discharged to Wrights Creek.

The changes to wastewater management in the East Royalty area was made possible thanks to two projects under the Clean Water and Wastewater Fund. For the construction of a sewer lift station and forcemain, the Government of Canada invested $1.925 million while the Government of Prince Edward Island and the City of Charlottetown each contributed over $962,000. For the upgrades to the gravity lines leading to the Charlottetown Pollution Control Plant, the Government of Canada invested $2.2 million while the Government of Prince Edward Island and the City of Charlottetown each contributed $1.1 million.

“We would like to thank all of our partners for making this project possible,” said Deputy Mayor Jason Coady, Chair of the City’s Water and Sewer Utility Committee. “We know there are many challenges for fishers this year, but we wish them all the best in their 2020 season and hope that this additional area for fishing is a little bit of positive news in these difficult times.”

For more information about the Clean Water and Wastewater Fund, visit: https://www.infrastructure.gc.ca/plan/cwwf/cwwf-program-programme-eng.html