Community Vegetable Planters

Yours to share and enjoy!


We currently have 21 large vegetable planters in Charlottetown are for the public to enjoy and share!
The vegetable planters at Victoria Park were an initiative of the Parks and Recreation Department.  They came about for a few reasons: the City Diamond parking lot needed to be defined to regulate parking and that area of the Park needed some beautification.

Around 2010, the Parks Department decided to make an effort to move towards planting fewer annuals, using plants that required less water, fewer inputs and maintenance and plant things that the public could benefit from directly.  As part of this initiative, we decided to plant tomatoes in the center of the planters along with the annuals.  In 2011, all of the planters were planted to vegetables and have been ever since.

Associated with the planters at Victoria Park, we hold a Gardening in Small Spaces workshop each year (2017 was our 7th annual) that focuses on different aspects of urban agriculture and then participants have an opportunity to help plant the vegetable planters.

There are now 11 vegetable planters in Victoria Park. Some have been built at different heights to accommodate users. One is a lasagna bed where the turf is covered with cardboard and then layers of green and brown compost are added to the bed. It is then left to decompose creating a nutrient rich organic bed with little effort. All of the planters are taken care of by Parks and Recreation horticulture staff. Each year we try to plant some new and interesting vegetables such as okra, broccolini and more.


Victoria Park




It took several years to get the word out to the public that the produce in the vegetable planters was there for public use. In the end, it has worked out really well and people have been very respectful in that they take some produce while leaving some for others as well.

In 2016, the Sustainability and Parks and Recreation Departments teamed up to plant three vegetable planters in Orlebar Park. The children from the local after school program come out to help plant them and they have been a big hit with the neighborhood residents. In 2017, a planter placed at the end of John Street in Orlebar Park, was switched from annual flowers to vegetables as well.

Orlebar Park




In 2016, as part of National Garden Days, the City held mini workshops on growing herbs and vegetables. Each participant received a small wooden box to plant, decorate and take home.

In 2017, three vegetable planters were added to Desbrisay Park as part of the Community Garden.

Desbrisay Park




We also added three planters to J. Frank MacAulay Park with the help of the Parkdale Sherwood Lions Club.

J. Frank MacAulay Park




That same year a large planter at Joe Ghiz Park was switched from annuals to vegetables and a couple of small containers were planted with tomatoes.

Joseph A. Ghiz Memorial Park




Overall, the vegetable planters are enjoyed by many and some locations have residents who visit them on a daily basis!